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texas, ms. jackson lee, for five minutes. ms. jackson lee: i ask unanimous consent to revise and extend. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. ms. jackson lee: mr. speaker, i have always had such great respect for this distinguished body. the holder and interpreter of democracy. the institution that proudly protects the constitution that was written by those who saw in this land this bright and shining sun, from sea to shining sea, enormous opportunity for freedom. so many people came to this nation and they came in many different ways. we don't carry the way we came into the future as much as the fact that we are grateful of the opportunity that this nation has given us. the nation has been able to turn the tide on embracing democracy in its fullest because of the constitution and the laws because we adhere to the three branches of government. so although my ancestors came to this nation in bondage and lasted for hundreds of years, slavery that has its remnants continuously as we move throughout society. there are now laws that can ensure no matter how you came to this country, n
-elect andrew jackson's wife died in december of 1828, her niece family assumed the role of first lady. >> paul goodman negatives washington had to say about andrew jackson, they loved family. negatives thate washington had to say about andrew jackson, they love at emily. she became his acting first lady. she entertained beautifully. she was polished. she knew exactly how to do the things. truck spill she was one of the ladies >> one of the women to serve as first lady. these and one of "first ladies: image and influence" begins on presidents' day. -- season one. >> he thought she was the smartest person he ever knew and he knew that she would tell him the truth. she was not going to sugarcoat. one of the tapes i absolutely love that came out was the one where she is analyzing his speech. he asked her to do it, but she was really tough on human. >> it started out nice. [laughter] >> mother always did start off nice. she "just, no, i think you should do..." he used to tell me your mother has the best judgment and you should always listen to your mother. he was devoted to american. >> remembering
. andrew jackson basically ended its charter. there's a long history of mistrust in parts of the united states about the central bank and what it does. back in the derickson and hamilton days, a lot of the farm state bankers did not trust the first bank of the united states. -- back in the days of jefferson and hamilton. there is a federal reserve board in washington made up of seven governors and chairman who is ben bernanke. then there are 12 regional fed banks. they're all part of this federal reserve system. the regional fed bank, every chartered bank of the united states has to pay in capital to the federal reserve banks and in return they get a dividend. but these are not banks the way we think of commercial banks. the federal reserve bank of new york is not like citigroup out there trying to earn big profits to return to shareholders. their job is to manage the money supply. it is also to be a lender of last resort in a crisis, which is what the federal reserve did in 2007. when there is a run on a bank, when depositors flee the banking system because they are scared their money
org. >> after andrew jackson wife died in december 1828, her niece assumed the role of first lady request family was perfect. she covered everything. the women all liked her. the women's opinions meant more than people thought in washington. emily became his acting first lady. she entertained beautifully. she was polis. -- she was polished. >> emily donaldson, one of the women who served as first lady in our series "first ladies, and applaud and image." and first of its kind product for television. season one begins on president's day at 9:00 p.m. >> a day after his state of the union, president obama traveled to north carolina to highlight his proposals for creating jobs. he repeated his call to raise the federal minimum wage to $9 an hour. these remarks permit in north carolina. re made in northade i carolina. >> hello everybody! hello, north carolina! it is good to be back. i love coming to asheville. love coming to asheville. michelle and i always talk about how, you know if after this whole presidency thing -- iowa! >> looking for a little spot to -- >> come on down! >> come
't think so. and with that i'd like to yield to my good friend and colleague from texas, sheila jackson lee. ms. jackson lee: let me thank the gentlelady from maryland and thank her for her leadership. this is a very important statement today because i was on the floor earlier this morning and said that we should not go home, we should stay here. i'll say it again, we should not go home. we should stay here. all the chatter of disagreement and accusations and blame games, what should be the message to the american people is, in fact, that we are committed to find some form of common ground. common ground is enormously challenging when there is no give from my republican friends. i do want to applaud congresswoman today that the violence against women act was passed because of democrats championing the right direction so that immigrant women, so that lgbt community, and so that native americans could be specifically covered, which as a lawyer is what the law is all about. fuzzy legislation cannot work, but when you specifically designate in law the protection of these groups, then you have b
're going to charlie. mississippi, independent line. caller: good morning. i am from jackson, where the capital is. i retired in 2009. it is a good thing. i was a civil servant. now in the state house there is legislation where some young republicans want to phase out our state retirement program for civil servants. house bill 486 allows people to just elect, if they want to contribute to like a personal retirement system instead of state retirement. host: as far as your personal plan, is that grandfathered by these proposals from the legislature? caller: most of the bill has been in committee. they grandfathered me in because they have retired -- because i have retired. the same thing will for the retirement system, it will bleed people also. host: you do not have to mention specifics, but do you receive a monthly benefit, then? >> it is -- caller: it is about $1,300. i have saved up about $30,000. i am set up, in a way. host: are you going to take social security? have you? caller: i am 58, it will be awhile. host: what did you do for the government? caller: i was a librarian. hos
. but if they can't stop the abuse they need to have a place to go. host: jackson from birmingham, alabama. caller: good morning. this should definitely not be open for discussion. i have a sister who has been through domestic violence. i don't know where these republicans come from. these are the worst law makers that i have ever seen in my entire life. we all need to vote in 2014 just like the democrats came out we need to be strong so we can get some of these republicans out of office. host: thanks for the call. guest: certainly the caller is right that this should not be up for discussion. obviously we have to discuss as we pass laws. but the issue of violence against women is one that's serious. and as he said, if you have a relative, a friend who has been a victim of domestic violence, then you know how important it is to have services available and how important it is to have a responsive law enforcement that knows how to deal with these cases, how do identify them. and for instance, the stalking data base really critical to dealing with that. very, very frightening and important. host: cou
jackson, the director of the epa made the statement in response live on tv to my question. it will cost between 300,000,000,400 billion per year. is this going to reduce co2 emissions? she said it will not. the reason is the problem is not here. it is in china. it is it in india and mexico. there is where you will have a problem with of the effect freebase. they have to go where there is energy. if we curtail energy over here with the text that will reduce the emissions, the mid back tree base will have to go to someplace. host: as many of the members know, james inhofe serving as the top republican on the senate armed services committee. birmingham, alabama. democratic calller. go ahead. caller: my question is i listened to the president last night. with all the things going on board -- with all the things going on around us with north korea, are we in a position to have a weaker military did what we had in 9/11 or should we have a stronger military? are we able to continue to scatter men all over the country and leave us defenseless at home or should the military continue to be strong
argued about it. there was a second bank of the united states that was created. andrew jackson basically ended its charter. there's a long history of mistrust in parts of the united states about the central bank and what it does. back in the jefferson and hamilton days, a lot of the farm state bankers did not trust the first bank of the united states. there is a federal reserve board in washington made up of seven governors and chairman who is ben bernanke. then there are 12 regional fed banks. they're all part of this federal reserve system. the regional fed bank, every chartered bank of the united states has to pay in capital to the federal reserve banks and in return they get a dividend. but these are not banks the way we think of commercial banks. the federal reserve bank of new york is not like citigroup out there trying to earn big profits to return to shareholders. their job is to manage the money supply. it is also to be a lender of last resort in a crisis, which is what the federal reserve did in 2007. when there is a run on a bank, when depositors flee the banking system becaus
. the clerk: leave of absence requested for mr. culberson of texas for today, and ms. jackson lee of texas for today. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the requests are granted. under the speaker's announced policy of january 3, 2013, the gentleman from arizona, mr. franks, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the majority leader. mr. franks: i thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, my comments today are heavily contribute to from author of the nature of war, ron tyra. i want to acknowledge him. he's a noted military expert, noted national security expert, and i appreciate so very much his seminal contribution to these comments. mr. speaker, a nuclear iran poses a severe and unfamiliar risk to the united states and its allies. we have to be very careful not to mistakenly assume that a relatively stable balance of deterrence, similar to the nuclear equilibrium between the united states and the soviet union during the cold war can be achieved with iran. a nuclear iran represents a very different type of threat that simply cannot be managed. a nuclear iran would serve to in
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10